Search

Overheard/Услышанное

Our correspondent recorded fragments of phrases and dialogues overheard in public places in Moscow about the war, Putin, and the current economic situation, which clearly characterise the anti-war sentiments of a large part of the population of large Russian cities.

'I saw a site that had proof that Putin is the antichrist.'

'Wow. Haven’t they blocked it?'

'Maybe the site's under God’s protection…'

*

'No to war, no to roach. In Russia for some reason these things are close to each other.'

[In Russian the words war and roach (vobla) have the same number of letters, begin with v, and in the dative both end with the letter ‘e’. ‘No to roach’ has become a new euphemism for ‘no to war’. This is since a woman from Tyumen called Alisa Klimentova, was arrested for writing Н* В***Е on the pavement in chalk. In court she said she hadn’t written 'No to War', but 'No to Roach' as she particularly dislikes this kind of fish. Amazingly, she was let off. This has spawned a whole movement of using the word Vobla (roach) instead of Voina (war) for example in this song on YouTube by Slepakov, which was posted on 14th October and has had almost 1.5m views. There is talk that roach is going to be banned in Russian shops.]

*

'They brought him recruitment papers, but he’s locked himself at home and isn’t coming out. He’s not even turning on the light.'

'That’s the way! But who’s going to the shop?'

'He’s still got reserves from the pandemic.'

*

'This fucking war is a fucking clusterfuck of course. That Crimean bridge. When I worked there, I was totally shocked. They didn’t pay everyone you see. People couldn’t even get home. The Rotenberg brothers . Two brother-cocksuckers.'

*

'I watched Navalny’s investigation about Golikova'

'Who’s Golikova?'

'Who’s she? She answers for poverty and health.'

'Ah, I see. So plenty of villas then.'

*

'It would be best to escape from nuclear war by going to Perm.'

'What’s in Perm?'

'Nothing. Just forest. They won’t chuck anything in that direction.'

*

In a restaurant:

'Let’s sit where it’s a bit quiet otherwise after you’ve had a drink you’ll yell about how Putin’s a cunt…'

*

'If I don’t want to kill anyone in Putin’s name then I have two options: prison or Bishkek.'

'And what have you decided?'

'I’ve decided I want to go to Paris. But for now I’m staying in Aviamotornaya.' [An area in Moscow].

***

Наш корреспондент записал услышанные им в общественных местах Москвы обрывки фраз и диалогов о войне, Путине, и текущей экономической ситуации, на наш взгляд довольно ярко характеризующие антивоенные настроения огромной части жителей крупных российских городов.


-Я видел сайт с доказательствами, что Путин - антихрист.

- Вау. Неужели его еще не заблокировали?

- Может быть, он под Божьей защитой этот сайт…

*

-Нет войне, нет вобле. В России все это рядом почему-то оказывается.

*

-Ему принесли повестку, а он дома заперся и не выходит. Даже свет не включает.

-Так и надо! А кто ходит в магазин?

-Да у него запасы еще с коронавируса лежат…

*

-Война эта ебучая…Пиздец, конечно. Мост этот крымский. Я когда на Крымском мосту работал, то я вообще в шоке был. Там всем не доплатили, понимаешь? Люди просто не могли домой уехать. Братья Ротенберги. Два брата-пидораса.

*

-Я смотрел расследование Навального про Голикову.

-Кто такая Голикова?

-Кто? Отвечает за бедность и здравоохранение.

-А, понятно. Виллы есть, значит.

*

-От ядерного взрыва лучше всего бежать в Пермь.

-А там что?

-Там ничего. Лес один. Туда не будут кидать.

*

В ресторане

-Давай сядем, где потише, а то ты сейчас выпьешь и будешь кричать, что Путин-мудак…

*

-Если я не хочу убивать людей во имя Путина, то у меня есть два пути: в тюрьму или в Бишкек.

-И что ты решил?

-Решил, что хочу в Париж. Но пока остаюсь на Авиамоторной.

Recent Posts

See All

Украина – это то, о чем думаешь ежеминутно и о чем стараешься не думать. С первых минут как я узнал о ракетных ударах стало ясно, что та жизнь, та страна, которую мы знали, закончилась навсегда. Еще к

Ukraine is what you think about every single minute and Ukraine is what you are always trying not to think about. From the moment I learned about the missile strikes, it became clear to me that life a